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Learn German - Prnounciation by TaNa-Jo Learn German - Prnounciation by TaNa-Jo

Learn German #5



This is long :I

BUT FOR MY COMING SERIES "LEARN GERMAN" THIS IS IMPORTANT TO KNOW BECAUSE I WONT WRITE THE SPELLING NEXT TO THE FOLLOWING PARTS! YOU SHOULD LEARN THE PRONOUNCIATION BEFORE CONTINUE WITH MY PARTS :D

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Diacritics

German uses the umlaut to alter the sounds of the vowels a, o and u: ä, ö and ü are distinctly different sounds than their un-umlauted relatives. One occasionally sees them printed in alternative spelling as ae, oe and ue, especially when someone has had trouble figuring out how to print an umlaut. The German alphabet also uses one extra consonant: the letter ß is called "es-tset", and is pronounced like an ordinary English s. One sometimes sees it printed as ss.

Vowels

As in English, German vowels generally have both long and short variants, and would-be long vowels are often shortened when they precede multiple consonants (e.g. Schmidt = shmit, not shmeet). Likewise, would-be short vowels are lengthened by doubling of the vowel (e.g. Staat = shtaht, Boot = boht, See = zay), or by the letter "h" placed after the vowel (e.g. Mahler = mah-ler, ohne = oh-nuh). Don't ever pronounce ee or oo the English way in a German word. Also take note of the German final e: it's not silent, but it is very short.

Diphthongs

These sounds are always the same. Do not confuse ie with ei, unless you want to annoy many people.

Consonants

Two rules you should know but can get away with not following: r is swallowed at ends of syllables as in British English (it colors the preceding vowel but is not pronounced), and voiced consonants at ends of syllables become voiceless (d becomes t, etc.).

Stress

The vast majority of German words are stressed on the first syllable. This rule fails most commonly in the following cases:

► Words that begin with certain short prefixes, the most common being ge-, be-, ver-, zer-, er- and ent-, are stressed on the syllable after this prefix, e.g. geteilt = ge-tiylt, betreten = be-tray-ten. Achtung: a few fairly common words begin with a ge- that is NOT grammatically a prefix, and therefore doesn't follow the above rule, e.g. gehen = gay-en (the verb "to go"), and gestern = gehs-turn

► In most words that contain the syllable ier (e.g. studieren, reserviert, regierende), this syllable is stressed. Many of these are Latin-derived verb forms with recognizable cognates in English.

► Occasionally you'll run across a word that has its stress on the last syllable; most of these are Latinate words which have cognates in French (and often also in English). One important example is Musik = moo-zeek. Those who know German well learn to recognize such words automatically, others are safest assuming stress on the first syllable when in doubt.

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:iconflamingcockatiel:
FlamingCockatiel Featured By Owner May 20, 2014
Perhaps you can help me. In the book 501 German Verbs,  the pronunciation guide lists long and short umlaute vowels. That is the only place I've read it, and, well, some of the examples sound exactly the the same whether long or short. What have you heard or studied regarding this?

Also, when does one use the estset?

I appreciate your guides. I like the notes you added regarding stress on words, because that is something that has been confusing me when I simply see a word written out.
Reply
:icontana-jo:
TaNa-Jo Featured By Owner May 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
when? well you have to learn the words with it - that are special verbs like the irregular verbs you hvae to learn for english :D
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:iconvoraciousamphy96:
VoraciousAmphy96 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014  Student General Artist
Ich lerne Deutsche :3


I've got a good accent for pronunciation of these words.
Although, this is a completely different language than Spanish,which I'm also learning.
I mean, When I know general language rules it ain't as hard.
Reply
:icontana-jo:
TaNa-Jo Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
*deutsch  > deutsch is written not capitalized :D If I may correct you

xD Yes english accent sounds terrible in german hahaa
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:iconvoraciousamphy96:
VoraciousAmphy96 Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2014  Student General Artist
Thanks :p

Well,I'm American,so yeah XDDDDDDD
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:iconshadowiscool123:
shadowiscool123 Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I need this.

Do you by any chance have one where it shows you what in the sentence to capitalize?
Reply
:icontana-jo:
TaNa-Jo Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
It will appear in the next series. It is very easy :P Does it look difficult? :o
Reply
:iconshadowiscool123:
shadowiscool123 Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm getting confused by it and I can't find any sources that tells me how...
Reply
:icontana-jo:
TaNa-Jo Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
all right I will upload it today
Reply
:iconshadowiscool123:
shadowiscool123 Featured By Owner Nov 30, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh, cool. Thanks! :)
Reply
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